Chirk

The small border town of Chirk lies in the Ceiriog Valley; the homeland for three of Wales most notable poets: Huw Morus (1662-1709), Robert Ellis (1812-1875) and John Ceiriog Hughes (1832-1887). Chirk Castle was one of several medieval Marcher fortresses sited on the Welsh-English border. Once the home of Sir Thomas Seymour, who married Catherine Parr (Henry VIII’s widow), it has been lived in almost continuously for 700 years. The magnificent 100 feet high stone railway viaduct was built in 1846 by Scottish engineer Henry Robertson, to facilitate the Shrewsbury and Chester Railway. The adjoining aqueduct was built in 1796 by Thomas Telford and William Jessop to carry the Ellesmere Canal.

 

Cats

I’ve never considered myself a cat-lover – I always gravitate more to horses and dogs, but I can’t resist a poser! The silver tabby was especially beautiful; discovered roaming the grounds of the historic house Tŷ Mawr Wybrnant. One of the hard-working cats at the stables has one blue eye and one green eye; a feline form of heterochromia, I learn. I imagine a more enviable job for a cat is that of the pub cat, always in a warm spot in the window. The black and white cat is a regular visitor to my garden and likes to stare me out.

 

 

Conwy Castle

Conwy Castle is a fortification in Conwy, located in North Wales. It was built by Edward I, during his conquest of Wales, between 1283 and 1289. Constructed as part of a wider project to create the walled town of Conwy, the combined defences cost around £15,000, a huge sum for the period. The 2017 Medieval Festival included jousting and battle re-enactments.

 

Carneddau Ponies

The Carneddau Mountain range in the Snowdonia National Park is home to around 300 Carneddau ponies whose history is thought to date back to the Bronze Age. Although they are not a rare breed as such, they are genetically distinct from the more well known Welsh Mountain pony. These ponies roam over some 20 square miles of mostly inhospitable terrain above Bethesda, Llanfairfechan, Capel Curig and Conwy.
The annual gathering of the Carneddau ponies: https://janruth.com/2018/11/05/the-big-picture/
Carneddau ponies as therapy ponies: https://janruth.com/2017/11/18/with-or-without-you/

Upper & Lower Slaughter

Lower Slaughter is a village in the Cotswold district of Gloucestershire, England, 4 miles south west of Stow-on-the-Wold. The village is built on both banks of the River Eye, a slow-moving stream crossed by two footbridges, which also flows through Upper Slaughter. The name Slaughter stems from the old English name for wet land, which means muddy place. Both villages sits by the Eye stream and are known for their unspoilt limestone cottages in the traditional Cotswold style.