In The Chair 46: Andrea Buginsky

Welcome, Andrea Buginsky.

How would you describe your writing style in only three words? 

Andrea: Roller coaster ride.

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If you could have a relationship with one of your fictional characters who would it be and why?

Andrea: Silvorhawk from The Chosen. He is kind-hearted, warm, and thoughtful. He’s honest and loyal, and will do anything for his family and friends.

If you had to exist for a week in one of your books … which one would it be? Would you be a central character or simply watch the story unfold from the sidelines?

Andrea: Any of the New Avalon books. I would love to be an Avalonian on the sidelines, attending New Avalon, learning about my craft and Arthurian history, and bonding with the other Avalonians.

My HeadshotDead or alive literary dinner party: who would you invite, and what would you serve?

Andrea: J.K. Rawling, Danielle Steel, Nicholas Sparks, John Green, Rick Riordan, and Stephen King. I would serve an assortment of  platters so everyone could choose their favorites, from surf and turf to Italian, great desserts, and a variety of drinks.

If you had to write in a different genre which would it be and why?

Andrea: YA Romance. I love writing for young adult readers. If I couldn’t write fantasy, I’d like to try my hand at romance novels. Though, I struggle to write some of the scenes in my books. But it would be fun to try.

What do you dislike the most about being an author?

Andrea: Coming up with new plot lines for my series. Everything needs to stay concise from book to book, but you have to have the characters discovering new things or going on new adventures to keep readers coming back for more.

Favourite Word: Awesomesauce!

Andrea Buginsky was in the chair: Author of ‘The Chosen’ series & ‘The New Avalon’ series  

11225179_1038937226125765_4282206662109631769_o  Web:http://www.andreabuginsky.com/

Authors: Fancy pulling out a chair? Send your answers to the same set of questions with a profile pic and one web link to jan@janruth.com

In The Chair 35: D.J.Bennett

Welcome, D. J. Bennett.

How would you describe your writing style in only three words?

Debbie: Gritty, graphic, up-close-and-personal. Are hyphens cheating?

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If you could have a relationship with one of your fictional characters who would it be and why?

Debbie: It’d have to be my bad-boy Lenny. He’s the only one I fancy. And since he’s as good with women as he is with guns, I suspect it would be a thrilling – if very dangerous – ride! I’d have to be thirty years younger, but since this is fiction, I don’t suppose it’d be a problem.

If you had to exist for a week in one of your books … which one would it be? Would you be a central character or simply watch the story unfold from the sidelines?

Debbie: All my crime books are set in contemporary England and mostly inner-city, or at least urban. Since I’m generally wallowing in the dregs of society, I don’t think I’d want to be a central character in any of my books, and I certainly wouldn’t want to be a minor character and risk being killed off. So I’d probably have to lurk – and interfere, of course. I’m good at interfering.

Dead or alive literary dinner party: who would you invite, and what would you serve?

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Debbie: I’ve been lucky enough to have eaten and/or got drunk with most of my favourite living authors already. People are never how you expect them to be, are they? So let’s go for dead ones. as they can’t talk back. Or am I bringing them to life for one night in some amazing feat of reincarnation? What about somebody like John Wyndham, maybe? With Robert Heinlein and Aldous Huxley. All hugely influential on my 11 year-old mind and set me off wanting to write stories too… What would we eat? A pub meal somewhere, nice and informal so we could concentrate on chatting. But there would have to be wine. Lots of wine.

If you had to write in a different genre which would it be and why?

Debbie: My writing roots are firmly set in fantasy – contemporary and epic. I’ve been involved in the fantasy scene for a couple of decades, dabbling in fiction and running conventions. If I wasn’t writing crime, I’d be back there playing with psychic stuff, world-jumping, telepathy and all that kind of thing. In fact I have an urban fantasy to finish when I’m done with my current crime project.

What do you dislike the most about being an author?

Debbie: Not having a life? Sometimes it’d be nice to not have anything to do. I’d love to sit down of an evening and watch television, without feeling the itch to put fingers to keyboard. Even when I’m not writing, I’m plotting. I’d be lovely to not feel that pressure.

 Favourite word?

Debbie: Love? No – that’s cheesy and nobody would believe it. What about Awesome? I say that a lot. But they don’t really mean anything do they? I use lots of words and I don’t have favourites as that wouldn’t be fair on the others. Can I have simply Bollocks? Or is that too rude? It just kind of sums up my attitude sometimes …

D. J. Bennett was in the chair: Author of  The Hamlin’s Child series, several short stories & a fantasy; Edge of Dreams.

Web: http://debbie-bennett.blogspot.co.uk/

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In The Chair 32: Matt Posner

Welcome, Matt Posner.

How would you describe your writing style in only three words?

Matt: Dialogue-driven, efficient, ironic.

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If you could have a relationship with one of your fictional characters who would it be and why?

Matt: Most of my characters are teenagers, and I am not, so there’s an obvious mismatch. But assuming ages could be equalized (I to hers, or she to mine) I would like to be with Simon’s fiancée in book 3 – Ana Vorkina, the Czech wizard. She is passionate and radiates a powerful life-force, and those things are a good contrast with my natural introversion.

If you had to exist for a week in one of your books … which one would it be? Would you be a central character or simply watch the story unfold from the sidelines?

Matt: I would absolutely like to live inside School of the Ages for a week. In fact, since the dean of the school looks exactly like me, maybe I DO live there. I am always the hero or the villain of my own story, but realistically I’m too timid to do more than watch the story unfold from the sidelines.

T.S. Eliot has stated my identity pretty precisely in “Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”: No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be; 

Am an attendant lord, one that will do
To swell a progress, start a scene or two,
Advise the prince; no doubt, an easy tool,
Deferential, glad to be of use,
Politic, cautious, and meticulous…

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Dead or alive literary dinner party: who would you invite, and what would you serve?

Matt: Colin Wilson, who recently died, is a man I bitterly regret never having met; I wish I had tried to write to him before he passed, but I was too timid. I would invite him first. Not that they would like each other, but I’d like to meet J.R.R. Tolkien and Ezra Pound, two writers who have blown me away with their style. And of course, I have many living writer friends I have never met in person with whom I would dearly love to break bread, beginning with a kind gentleman who has advised me well in the past: Andre Jute.

If you had to write in a different genre which would it be and why?

Matt: I hope that someday I will write thrillers. Not soon – I don’t have enough great ideas for them yet – but I think this is a genre in which I can connect to a larger readership than with my YA or my nonfiction.

What do you dislike the most about being an author?

Matt: I don’t like the commercial aspect of it. Though being self-published is preferable to being screwed by a publisher (which has also happened to me), I see the big disconnect between the trends in popular taste that control success, and the impulse to follow my own sense of what I would like to read and must therefore write. I don’t like seeing low-quality authors, like E.L. James, make massive sales because they have hit the trend jackpot. If I try to write what’s trendy, I’ll be insincere and the work will suck. If I write what my instincts tell me, I have the psychological torture of monitoring limp sales figures.

 Favourite word? 

Matt: I am digging lately the expression from Hamlet, “miching mallecho.” It means “sneaky evil-doing,” where “mallecho” is Shakespeare’s version of Spanish “mal hecho”. Sample sentence:
“James Patterson’s new ‘learn how to write’ online course is one more example of miching mallecho from the ex-marketing exec.”

Matt Posner was in the chair: Author of the YA series – School of the Ages and several non-fiction titles.

Web:http://schooloftheages.webs.com/

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In The Chair 29:Jerome Mark Antil

Welcome, Jerome Mark Antil.

How would you describe your writing style in only three words?

Jerome: Lighthearted, Nostalgia, Family. 

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If you could have a relationship with one of your fictional characters who would it be and why?

Jerome: In my book series – The Pompey Hollow Book Club – my characters are all real people – some combined in nature, some standing alone.  The tales and adventures are based on some foundation of truth – getting taller in the telling. My historical backdrops are painstakingly researched and detailed for accuracy…typically about the family farm country in the shadows of WWII.  Add to that the fact, I grew up in that time.

If you had to exist for a week in one of your books … which one would it be? Would you be a central character or simply watch the story unfold from the sidelines?

Jerome: I am a central character in my series – so I would enjoy staying that person. He’s a lad who moved from a city, at the age of nine, to a heavily wooded, farm area — and who seemed to constantly trip into new experiences and adventures just learning how to cope.

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Dead or alive literary dinner party: who would you invite, and what would you serve?

Jerome: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; John Steinbeck; Ernest Hemingway; Dwight David Eisenhower and Winston Churchill.  I would serve brandy…and sit and listen.

If you had to write in a different genre which would it be and why?

Jerome: I call my work historical fiction – lighthearted nostalgia.  I suppose I would like to create a Holmes or a Poirot or Mrs. Fisher.  I enjoy a tangled web of surprises.

What do you dislike the most about being an author?

Jerome: That I didn’t begin many years ago…although I wouldn’t have been properly aged for the task, I suppose.

 Favourite word? 

Jerome: Yes.

Jerome Mark Antil was in the chair: Author of the YA series – The Pompey Hollow Book Club. The Long Stem is in the Lobby, (memoir) & A Handbook for Weekend Dad’s (non-fiction). Published by Little York Books.

Web: www.jeromemarkantil.com

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