Telegraph Valley Steam Train Linear

A linear walk of 7.5 miles including 1,600 feet of elevation overall. Start Point: Snowdonia Parc Pub on the A498, Waunfawr, Caernarfon, LL55 4AQ. Map References: SH 52664 58825  or Lat:  53-66210 Lon: -4.202379

adult-blur-boots-1452784A pub at the start and the finish coupled with free parking and a short train journey, makes this route a walk of convenience with plenty of scope to stretch the legs in-between. Much of the climb is at the start of the walk, heading up to the point where walkers bound for Snowdon separate from those heading towards Llanberis along Telegraph Valley. The area is named after the first Marconi long-wave transmitting station in Britain, the remains of which are still in situ. Good clear paths throughout, requiring only a modest amount of navigation towards the end of the walk as the Slate Trail leads one back to the start through areas of rough pastureland and the outskirts of Waunfawr. Evidence of the slate industry is strong across the landscape, with the Dinorwic quarry clearly visible above Llanberis and Llyn Padarn.

The origins of the Welsh Highland railway – the oldest railway company in the world – can be traced back to the Nantlle horse-drawn railway in 1828 connecting the slate quarries at Nantlle with Caernarfon, a distance of about eight miles. It was converted into a standard gauge railway in the 1860s. Eventually the line was developed to reach Portmadoc, a journey of 25 miles from Caernarfon, where it then connects to the Ffestiniog line. The romance of the steam and the rattle of the carriages provides a historic atmosphere which feels completely fitting to Snowdonia’s heritage, and the route passes through some spectacular scenery. Times and ticket prices available online. If you’re a North Wales resident, it’s well worth purchasing a member/loyalty card for discounted trips.

The route

  1. Cross over the bridge to the railway platform. Take the train to the Snowdon Ranger. Note: this is a request stop so be sure to inform the guard. Leave the train at the Snowdon Ranger stop, then cross the train track to join the Snowdon Ranger path. This is clearly denoted as a stone track passing behind some farm buildings and then zig-zagging all the way up to a distinct fork.
  2. Turn left towards Llanberis. Pass through the gate and, keeping Snowdon to the rear walk straight on as the route descends gradually through Telegraph Valley; until after the 4 mile point you reach a single-track road.
  3. Turn left. Continue up to a stile and follow the well-defined path as it climbs towards the disused quarry by Donen Las, Groeslon.
  4. Walk between the slate heaps on a stone track which changes to a single-track road heading down towards Waunfawr. Look for a finger-post on the left at Caer Corlan , also signed for the Slate Trail (yellow arrow) and the North Wales Pilgrim’s Way.
  5. Walk along this permitted driveway and after the two dwellings pass through the gate and turn right at the Slate Trail sign. Continue to follow the yellow arrows.
  6. As the path descends, look for a Slate Trail post to the right and pass over a wooden bridge via two metal gates into rough pastureland. Keep straight on with the stone wall to the left. At the single-track road turn left downhill.
  7. Pick up the yellow arrows again, taking a right turn down a footpath through more rough pasture, passing through kissing gates and the rear of some properties to arrive at the junction of several driveways.
  8. Go straight on, picking up the North Wales Pilgrim’s Way sign by the footpath. At the single-track road, turn right for a short distance towards some properties before taking the footpath on the left. Turn left at the end of the path and after a short distance along the main road, the Snowdon Parc is on the left.

The described route is a guide only, it’s always advisable to use a map or a GPS device.

Moel Eilio

A circular walk of 7.5 miles including 2,500 feet of elevation overall. Start Point: The disused quarry by Donen Las, Groeslon, Waunfawr. Map References: SH 5509159893  or Lat: 53.116473  Lon: -4.166625

adult-blur-boots-1452784Moel Eilio is situated approximately 3 miles north-west of Snowdon. It has two subsidiary tops, Foel Gron and Foel Goch. From the elevated start point below Cefn Du, Moel Eilio looks remarkably modest; a mere hill alongside its more impressive neighbours, but then mountains nestled in the foothills of Snowdon will always look like the poor relation. In terms of endurance this route is not to be underestimated as the undulating nature of this cluster of 3 summits requires some stamina. And then, just as you might think it’s all easy going as one heads for home through Telegraph Valley, there’s a final ascent to return to the start point. But the climbing is well worth the effort. On a clear day the scenery is spectacular across the ridge, affording views across to Anglesey and Llanddwyn Island, the Llyn Peninsular, the Rivals, the Nantlle Ridge, and of course, the Snowdon Horseshoe. The way is well defined on grassy tracks or bridleways.

The Telegraph Path is so named after the first successful Marconi long-wave transmitting station, situated on the west-northwest slopes of Cefn Du. The station was in use between 1912 and 1938 and was for many years the most important long-wave station in Britain, handling imperial and international communications. The site closed in 1938 but remains of the buildings are still visible. Historical evidence of the slate industry is another strong feature of this landscape, as nearby Llanberis clearly illustrates via Dinorwic Quarry – a vast scar embedded in the hillside above Llyn Padarn. The first commercial attempts at slate mining in the area took place in 1787. By the late nineteenth century, Penrhyn and Dinorwic were the two largest slate quarries in the world. 

The route

  1. From the parking area, turn left along the track past the slate tips until the fingerpost sign directs you onto the main route across Moel Eilio. It’s a well-defined ascent and the summit is denoted by a large stone shelter.
  2. Ignore the ladder stile by the shelter and, following the fence-line on the right, continue downhill in a southerly direction, keeping Snowdon ahead at all times. Take the next ladder stile over the wall, keeping the fence-line to the left.
  3. Tackle the curving ridge of Foel Gron, then take the next stile, keeping the fence-line on the right. The next two stiles crop up almost together forming a right angle, before ascending the final grassy knoll of Foel Goch.
  4. Once over the summit, the track begins to descend the short but steep flanks of Foel Goch. Bear right here on an eroded track heading towards the bottom of the valley where the Telegraph Path skirts the foot of Snowdon.
  5. On reaching the bottom, loop back by turning sharp left along the Telegraph Path, a long bridleway which heads down towards Llanberis and runs parallel to the Moel Eilio trio of hills. Good views to the right of Llanberis, Dinorwic Quarry, and Llyn Padarn.
  6. Follow the bridleway for some 4 miles, passing the Marconi Tower to your left and ignoring all right-hand routes down to Llanberis. Pass through all the boundary gates and stiles and continue straight on as the path begins to ascend.
  7. At the T junction turn left and continue the ascent along the slate trail bridleway until a final kissing gate returns you to the start.

The described route is a guide only, it’s always advisable to use a map or a GPS device.