The Other Woman

41ERDI7XjpL._SY346_Fran, trapped in a soulless marriage with a controlling bully of a man and an indifferent son, lives for her sensitive, secret lover. They hatch a plan to make a new life together. But when the final rendezvous goes awry, she is left with a heart-stopping race to retrace her steps and resume her old life before her indiscretion is discovered. But what has happened to Jack? His silence is painful and confusing. Jack is married to Helena, trapped in a marriage with a needy, volatile, wealthy woman dependent on alcohol and irritated by Jack’s lack of creativity and earnings. But as their relationship begins to fragment, Fran finds the strength to break free of her destructive marriage to discover not only does she have the wherewithal to be truly independent, she’s found the confidence to build relationships based on truth and reality.

Such clever writing, in that my allegiance was with Fran, the ‘other woman,’ the whole way through, and not Helena. Full of tension, especially throughout Fran’s half of the story, and so addictive! It really kept me turning the pages. And as well as a pacy plot moving between Fran and Helena, there is real depth to the characters – whether we like them or not – a reality-based insight into relationships, love and marriage, and children. I love how the entire cast knits together, how they rise and fall by their own hand. It delivered all the elements I enjoy in a novel.

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The Judge’s Wife

51JgJmt0TWL1950’s Ireland and Grace is coerced into an arranged marriage to an older, wealthy judge by her guardian – a cruel, ruthless aunt. Grace eventually falls in love with an Indian doctor, Vikram, and falls pregnant. Poor Grace is sent to an asylum a few days after giving birth in order to hide the scandal. Vikram is told that Grace has died in childbirth, and Grace is told that her child didn’t survive. Thirty years later and the culmination of all these lies reach breakpoint when Emma – who believes her mother, Grace, died many years ago – returns to attend to her father’s estate on his death, and so begins a journey to discover the full extent of her father’s deception.
I thought this was quite a page-turner for a number of reasons. It’s a highly complex tale with two time-slips set in both India and Ireland, but it didn’t quite work for me as many important aspects felt skimmed over and a bit thin. I thought it lacked some depth, especially of character, and as the story gathered pace the plot began to feel like a procession of shock twists – some of them not especially credible. There were a few niggles with the grammar too, with many repeated words, in particular ‘pleats,’ and ‘pleated.’ And why was Martin repeatedly called ‘The Judge’, when his name would have been more realistic? Emma was a shadowy figure for me, and no explanation as to why the aunt was so cruel. And when Grace – an especially weak character – is taken to the asylum after giving birth there was no reference to her physical or emotional state. The romantic aspects were quite sugary, perhaps too light for the overall tone of the book. Despite this I did read to 80% and then skimmed to the end. All the ingredients were there; the historical time-slips, the secrets, the prejudice of the times, and the forbidden love stories: it just wasn’t executed to my taste. Fabulous descriptions of India, and I love the beautiful cover.

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