In The Chair 75: Sue Moorcroft

Welcome, Sue Moorcroft.

DSC_3417How would you describe your writing style in only three words?

Sue: Flowing. Attention-grabbing. Pacy.

If you could have a relationship with one of your fictional characters who would it be and why?

Sue: Sam, from my forthcoming book, The Christmas Promise. He surprised me a bit. He’s sophisticated and strong but his vulnerabilities are what make him unusual. He’s a real ‘go to’ ‘can do’ heroic hero. He’s highly imaginative and creative and that seems like it would be fun …

11102784_844407928976852_7866671121152746412_nIf you had to exist for a week in one of your books … which one would it be? Would you be a central character or simply watch the story unfold from the sidelines?

Sue: I’m going to say The Wedding proposal because it’s set in Malta and I love to be there! I’d watch the story unfold from the sidelines but it would be like watching a train wreck, seeing things conspiring against Elle. I’d want to warn her but I don’t know how she can act or react any differently as issues mount up against her.

Dead or alive literary dinner party: who would you invite, and what would you serve?

81f985c03b1cca527822783d2df8fcccSue: On my guest list would be Nevil Shute, Georgette Heyer, Stephen Fry, and some romantic suspense authors such as Suzanne Brockmann. I’m not too worried about the main course but I’d make a stonking chocolate dessert. (No calories at this dinner party, right?) And we’d drink champagne.

If you had to write in a different genre which would it be and why?

Sue: I always try and duck this question because all genres other than my own seem equally unlikely! I could probably pull together a fantasy because I like the idea of creating an unbelievable world for people to believe in.

What do you dislike the most about being an author?

Sue: My annual accounts. Sometimes I find first drafts hard but I don’t dislike them (much).

Favourite word?  Sue: Success.

Sue Moorcroft was in the chair, author of contemporary women’s fiction with occasionally unexpected themes. A past vice chair of the Romantic Novelists’ Association and editor of its two anthologies, Sue also writes short stories, serials, articles, writing ‘how to’ and is a creative writing tutor.

Web: www.suemoorcroft.com.

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In The Chair 62: Christina Jones

Merry Christmas, Christina Jones!

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How would you describe your Christmas in only three words?

Christina: Cosy, sparkly, snug

If you could have a relationship with a literary festive character who would it be and why?

Christina: Bob Crachit from A Christmas Carol (I’m a bit obsessive about Dickens…). But Bob Crachit, while possibly not my physical ideal – I tend to think he’s a bit of weed and looks nothing like Jonathan Rhys Meyers, but this is fantasy and a girl can dream! So, bless him… Such a cheerful, positive, hard-working chap despite the drudgery of his poorly-paid job, and the sadness at home (Tiny Tim – not a well child, and to be honest, possibly a bit of a goody-two-shoes – and no doubt getting *all* the attention). Sorry, Mrs C – but I’d like to spend a little festive time with your husband and show him the joyous side of Christmas – long before old Ebeneezer sees the light and sends you the turkey and gives you the pay rise etc. Bob and I could walk the snowy Victorian streets, hand-in-hand, peeking through the lighted windows of the houses we passed, watching the children decking the halls and dressing the new-fangled Christmas trees… And in the lamp-light, as the snowflakes fell, we’d listen to the angelic voices carried on the icy air as the choirs sing Christmas carols in the street for the very first time. And then, in the darkness we’d share a kiss under the mistletoe – and I hope he’d go home to his tumultuous family a happier man.

snowglobe-peppaIf you had to exist for a week in a Christmas story … which one would it be?

Christina: Peppa Pig’s Christmas. I adore Peppa and her lovely, cosy, happy family life. And I’ve read and re-read this story to my granddaughter, and it’s just perfect. Everything about The Pig’s run-up to Christmas is just perfect. Old-fashioned, amusing, chaotic, a little crazy – just like home! I’d be so happy there!

Dead or alive literary Christmas lunch: who would you invite, and what would you serve?  

Christina: Peppa Pig and Charles Dickens and the whole cast of A Christmas Carol for the above reasons. James Stewart so he can give us all the inside info and gossip on the making of It’s A Wonderful Life. And J Jefferson Farjeon who wrote some gorgeous-to-curl-up-with Christmas mysteries back in the 1930s. I’m a rubbish cook but a good hostess, so I’d get them nicely warmed-up and relaxed with whisky-macs and my special snowballs, then serve the full traditional roast dinner – turkey with all the trimmings, and a big Christmas pud made by my mum who was an ace cook – oh, and as I’m a veggie, there’d be a nut roast as well…

redfaceIf you had to write a Christmas themed story in your current genre, what would the title be?

Christina: Christmas Stockings!

What do you dislike the most about Christmas? Christina: Commercialism. And the fact that it all starts so early. I don’t even think about Christmas until Advent. And the fact that the TV advertisers seem to think a sofa or a flat-screen telly is going to make Christmas soooo much better.

Favourite festive word? Christina: Mistletoe!

Christina Jones was in the Christmas chair: author of several award winning novels. Published by Accent Press.

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Web: http://ow.ly/UycOE

In The Chair 61: Joanne Philips

Merry Christmas, Joanne Phillips!

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How would you describe your Christmas in only three words? Joanne: Snuggly. Sparkly. Relaxing.

If you could have a relationship with a literary festive character who would it be and why? Joanne: I think it would have to be a deep friendship with the Ghost of Christmas Present – I have a tendency to live either to much in the past, worrying about what I did or didn’t get right, or too much in the future, worrying about what’s yet to come. At Christmas I need to learn to live in the ‘now’ and just enjoy the moment.

MiracleOn34thStreet_1947_315x236If you had to exist for a week in a Christmas story … which one would it be? Joanne: Something uplifting like the film A Miracle on 34th Street for me, with snow and tinsel and New York streets and people rushing home for the holidays with armfuls of brightly wrapped presents.

Dead or alive literary Christmas lunch: who would you invite, and what would you serve?  Joanne: Sorry, but it’s just me and my family for Christmas lunch, I don’t care how literary you are. This year I’m serving traditional turkey with all the trimmings – yummy!

If you had to write a Christmas themed story in your current genre, what would the title be? Joanne: Maybe ‘The Tinsel Tragedy’? or how about ‘The Fairy Light Fiasco’? Yes, I think I’ll incorporate that into my Flora Lively series – Flora Lively and the Fairy Light Fiasco. Perfect.

What do you dislike the most about Christmas? Joanne: Travelling. My husband’s family live a long way away and although it is, of course, wonderful to see them, it is a horrible time of year to tackle the motorways.

Favourite festive word? Joanne: Sherry

Joanne Phillips was in the Christmas chair. Author of several romance titles and the Flora Lively mystery series. 

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Web: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Joanne-Phillips/e/B0083UEG86/

In The Chair 59: Susanne O Leary

Merry Christmas, Susanne O’ Leary!

SantaToymakerChair

How would you describe your Christmas in only three words? 

Susanne: Rowdy, noisy, fun.

If you could have a relationship with a literary festive character who would it be and why? Susanne: I can only think of one literary festive character and that is Scrooge. I would definitively not want a relationship with him! But put Colin Farrel in my Christmas stocking and you’re talking! I don’t think I have to explain why…

If you had to exist for a week in a Christmas story … which one would it be? Susanne: “A Country Christmas” by Louisa M Alcott. Christmas in Vermont in the nineteenth century would probably be amazing.

5582089Dead or alive literary Christmas lunch: who would you invite, and what would you serve?

Susanne: I’d have Hemingway, George Bernard Shaw, Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters. I’d serve them an old fashioned, traditional Christmas lunch, but then I would have servants, so I could sit and chat to all those amazing authors.

If you had to write a Christmas themed story in your current genre, what would the title be?  Susanne: I did and the title is HOT WISHES– A Kerry Christmas. It’s set in the west of Ireland

What do you dislike the most about Christmas? Susanne: The stress and pressure to have everything ready in time. And cooking the traditional Irish Christmas dinner. But once it’s done it’s pretty good, actually.

12209115_10205049546790641_394393214_oFavourite Festive Word?  Susanne: Jingle Bells!

Susanne O’Leary was in the Christmas chair: writing across several genres including romance & political thrillers.

Web: http://www.susanne-oleary.co.uk

In The Chair 57: Louise Wise

Merry Christmas, Louise Wise!

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How would you describe your Christmas in only three words?  Louise: Run (for) your life.

(I know that’s four words, but if you say it quickly it sounds like three!). I’m a bargain hunter and little frugal. I’ve a gingerbread house that’s in its tenth year! But I do go overboard at Christmas. Imagine a tacky Santa’s grotto—that’s my house.

If you could have a relationship with a literary festive character who would it be and why?

Louise: Scrooge (who’d have thought!). So I could nail the three ghosts and keep the miserable old bugger a miserable old bugger. People like him are needed to keep the self-righteous in smugland, because we, in turn, need the smug (aka do-gooders) to tell us how to do things correctly so that, God forbid, we might just cross a road without waiting for the Green Man!

If you had to exist for a week in a Christmas story … which one would it be?

imagesLouise: Exist for a week? A whole week? Are you kidding me! All that festive goo and cheer and people being nice and stuff? Eeeeooow.  Got it… Grinch! Jim Cary’s zany sense of humour would have me rocking with laughter so I’d like to be Mrs Grinch (or bit-on-the-side-Grinch).

Dead or alive literary Christmas lunch: who would you invite, and what would you serve? 

dean-koontz-dean-koontz-i-have-avoided-becoming-stale-by-putting-aLouise: Dean Koontz – for his intense writing skill and I’d pick his brain and hang on to his every word and probably annoy the hell out of him. William Shakespeare – because I can never understand why he’s a ‘great’. Charles Dickens – because he WAS a great. Virgina Wolf and Jane Austin because they look like you could have a really girly laugh with them. Terry Pratchett – just because. Terry Deary (Horrible Histories) – because he got my kids interested in books, and I figure I owe him a lunch. And what would I cook? Well, it would have to be the traditional turkey with all the trimmings. Everyone hates it but you have to eat it because Father Christmas said so—oops, mother talking again!

If you had to write a Christmas themed story in your current genre, what would the title be?

Louise: I always thought my genre was stories with a romantic twist but as I’ve developed as a writer, I’ve realised my stories, be them romance or sci-fi, have a loneliness theme. So, the title for my Christmas theme story would have to be: Lonely this Christmas—Bah Humbug.

What do you dislike the most about Christmas?

Louise: When it’s over. Yes, seriously, I love Christmas. The rushing to get everything ready in time for that one day, the present buying, the panic buying of crap presents at 5 pm on Christmas eve, the binge drinking and eating, rubbish TV, and I suppose, without sounding too cheesy, family get-togethers.

xmas author picFavourite festive word?

Louise: Jolly! Only Miranda Hart can say ‘jolly’ throughout the year.

Louise Wise was in the Christmas chair: Web: http://amzn.to/1k6zpL0

A last word from Mrs wise words…

NEW RELEASE 16th DECEMBER 2016: WILD AWAKE ASLEEP

51gylqx66lPast events can be changed but one must be careful of how one does it because it’ll impact on the rest of one’s life.’—Dáire Quin, Modify your Destiny if you Must, 2003. No one saw Julie’s car leave the road, no one saw her crash into the watery ditch, no one saw the gnarled tree branch pierce through the window screen and impale her to her seat. No one heard her screams. Yet, this was the beginning of Julie’s life. Julie Compton, is a forty-something woman, striving for success in a male dominated business world. She thinks she’s made it. She thinks she has it all. Trouble is, her destiny has been travelling in the wrong direction and Julie is now forced to relive her life by occupying people’s bodies from her past in a time-travel, paranormal adventure.

For readers who enjoyed books like ‘The Time Traveler’s Wife’ and ‘The Lovely Bones’.

http://bookShow.me/B01N2QW3VX