The Judge’s Wife

51JgJmt0TWL1950’s Ireland and Grace is coerced into an arranged marriage to an older, wealthy judge by her guardian – a cruel, ruthless aunt. Grace eventually falls in love with an Indian doctor, Vikram, and falls pregnant. Poor Grace is sent to an asylum a few days after giving birth in order to hide the scandal. Vikram is told that Grace has died in childbirth, and Grace is told that her child didn’t survive. Thirty years later and the culmination of all these lies reach breakpoint when Emma – who believes her mother, Grace, died many years ago – returns to attend to her father’s estate on his death, and so begins a journey to discover the full extent of her father’s deception.
I thought this was quite a page-turner for a number of reasons. It’s a highly complex tale with two time-slips set in both India and Ireland, but it didn’t quite work for me as many important aspects felt skimmed over and a bit thin. I thought it lacked some depth, especially of character, and as the story gathered pace the plot began to feel like a procession of shock twists – some of them not especially credible. There were a few niggles with the grammar too, with many repeated words, in particular ‘pleats,’ and ‘pleated.’ And why was Martin repeatedly called ‘The Judge’, when his name would have been more realistic? Emma was a shadowy figure for me, and no explanation as to why the aunt was so cruel. And when Grace – an especially weak character – is taken to the asylum after giving birth there was no reference to her physical or emotional state. The romantic aspects were quite sugary, perhaps too light for the overall tone of the book. Despite this I did read to 80% and then skimmed to the end. All the ingredients were there; the historical time-slips, the secrets, the prejudice of the times, and the forbidden love stories: it just wasn’t executed to my taste. Fabulous descriptions of India, and I love the beautiful cover.

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